BUDDHA SABBASAVA SUTTA II

 

‘And which are the Asavas to be abandoned by Samvara [subjugation]?

Herein, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu, wisely reflecting, remains shut in by the subjugation of the organ of Sight.  For whereas to the Bhikkhu not shut in by the subjugation of the organ of sight Asavas may rise, full of vexation and distresss, to the Bhikkhu shut in by the subjugation of the organ of sight the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu remains shut in by the subjugation of the organ of Hearing.  For whereas to the  Bhikkhu not shut in by the subjugation of the organ of hearing Asavas may arise, full of vexation and distress, to the Bhikkhu shut in by the subjugation of the organ of hearing the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu remains shut in by the subjugation of the organ of Smell.  For whereas to the Bhikkhu not shut in by the subjugation of the organ of smell Asavas may arise, full of vexation and distresss, to the Bhikkhu shut in by the subjugation of the organ of smell the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu remains shut in by the subjugation of the organ of Taste.  For whereas to the Bhikkhu not shut in by the subjugation of the organ of taste Asavas may arise, full of vexation and distress, to the Bhikkhu shut in by the subjugation of the organ of taste the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu remains shut in by the subjugation of the organ of Touch.  For whereas to the Bhikkhu not shut in by the subjugation of the organ of touch Asavas may arise, full of vexation and distress, to the Bhikkhu shut in by the subjugation of the organ of touch the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu remains shut in by the subjugation of the organ of Mind. For whereas to the Bhikkhu not shut in by the subjugation of the organ of mind Asavas may arise, full of vexation and distress, to the Bhikkhu shut in by the subjugation of the organ of mind the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

These, Bhikkhus, are called the Asavas to be abandoned by Samvara.

And which are the Asavas to be abandoned by Patisevana [right use]?

Herein, Bhikkhus, a Bhikkhu, wisely reflecting, makes use of his robes for the purpose only of warding off the cold, of warding off the heat, of warding off the contact of gad-flies and mosquitoes, of wind and sun, and snakes; and of covering his nakedness.

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu makes use of alms, not for sport or sensual enjoyment, not for adorning or beautifying himself, but solely to sustain the body in life, to prevent its being injured, to aid himself in the practice of a holy life – thinking the while, “Thus shall I overcome the old pain, and shall incur no new; and everywhere shall I be at ease, and free from blame.”

Wisely reflecting, the Bhikkhu makes use of an abode; only to ward off cold, to ward off heat, to ward off the contact of gad-flies and mosquitoes, of wind and sun, and snakes; only to avoid the dangers of the climate, and to secure the delight of privacy.

Wisely reflecting, the  Bhikkhu makes use of medicine and other necessaries for the sick; only to ward off the pain that causes injury, and to preserve his health.

For whereas, Bhikkhus, to the Bhikkhu not making such right use, Asavas may arise, full of vexation and distress; to the Bhikkhu making such right use, the Asavas, full of vexation and distress, are not.

These, Bhikkhus, are called the Asavas to be abandoned by Patisevana.’

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[To be continued].

 

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